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patricia.asalin
Thesis Help: PICC Line Costs In Hospitals

Thought this would be one great resource for the Thesis help I need.  Please help with direct input & insights as well as resource/reference (article) suggestions.

 

I am trying to answer 2 questions:

1. What is the actual cost of 'PICC Line Insertions' in a hospital.

2. Do hospitals routinely lose money on PICC Line insertions.

 

Thanks 

JudyThompson
This sounds like a perfect
This sounds like a perfect question for Kathy Kokotis.
DML RN
Try these for a start: 1.

Try these for a start:

1. Robinson,Malcolm K. MD, Mogensen,K, Grudinskas,G, Kohler,S, Jacobs,D. Improved care and reduced costs for patients requiring peripherally inserted central catheters: the role of bedside ultrasound ans a dedicated team. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 2005:29 (374-379)

2. David,J, Kokotis,K. A new perspective for PICC line insertions: Cost effectiveness associated with an independent PICC service. Journal of the Association of Vascular Access Vol 9,No. 2 June 2004 (93-98)

. Hornsby,S,Matter,K, Beets,B, Casey,S,Kokotis,K. Cost losses associated with the "PICC,stick and run team" concept. Journal of Intravenous Nursing Vol 28(1),Jan/Feb 2005 (45-53)

7. Kokotis,K. Cost containment and infusion services. Journal of Infusion Nursing Vol 28,No3S May/June 2005 (S22-32)

 

lynncrni
Hospitals do not loose money
Hospitals do not loose money by inserting PICCs, when they are chosen for the correct placements. Consider this- the operational cost of placing a PIV is around $35 to $40 and a PICCs operational cost of insertion is $330 (new figure reported by Jamie Bowen at AVA this year). The average number of attempts reported to insert 1 PIV is 2.18 (2.35 for peds). So this means that it will cost the hospital about $78.30 to get 1 PIV established. If the patient requires more than 4 sites, they have exceeded the cost of PICC insertion. These are not patient charges, but hospital operational costs. So when therapy is indicated for more than a week or when the patients veins are terrible, a PICC can save money for the hospital. But this is not about what money is going to be reimbursed to the hospital. It is about cost-containment so the hospital can retain a greater portion of the capitated fee (DRG, HMO, etc) that they are receiving. Lynn

Lynn Hadaway, M.Ed., NPD-BC, CRNI

Lynn Hadaway Associates, Inc.

PO Box 10

Milner, GA 30257

Website http://www.hadawayassociates.com

Office Phone 770-358-7861

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