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osmolarity guidelines

Most of the literature I read states that medications or solutions with a pH <5 or >9, or with an osmolarity

>500 should be infused centrally.  INS S38 II G says "osmolarity >600"  Why the difference, I wonder.

I have been teaching 500mOsm, but don't want to exceed INS standards.  Any ideas why these are

different?  Is there new info out there?

Thanks,

Tanya

lynncrni
This was changed from 500 to
This was changed from 500 to 600 with the 2006 edition of the standards. We found articles referencing 600 but not 500. So we corrected this to be in line with the references. Lynn

Lynn Hadaway, M.Ed., RN, BC, CRNI

Lynn Hadaway Associates, Inc.

126 Main Street, PO Box 10

Milner, GA 30257

Website http://www.hadawayassociates.com

Office Phone 770-358-7861

richarp
I am looking for information

I am looking for information on osmolarity of Iv medications such as vancomycin & etc. I am in a IV therapy class & they would like for us to find out the osmolarity of different IV meds. I have contacted the hospital phamacy with no luck. Anyone know where this info can be found? Thanks Pat

lynncrni
When the pharmacy purchases
When the pharmacy purchases drugs already compounded, such as antibiotics in a small volume bag, the osmolarity is on the manufacturers label. If your pharmacy is doing all the compounding, the osmolarity must be calculated based on the diluent and drug. I can understand why a busy pharmacy may resist providing this information to you, however this resistance is coming from their lack of knowledge about the importance of this for peripheral vein infusion. I do not know of a reference that provides this information because it is different for each type and volume of diluent. Lynn

Lynn Hadaway, M.Ed., RN, BC, CRNI

Lynn Hadaway Associates, Inc.

126 Main Street, PO Box 10

Milner, GA 30257

Website http://www.hadawayassociates.com

Office Phone 770-358-7861

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