Forum topic

5 posts / 0 new
Last post
Nikki LHommedieu
IV administration
Is there a way to ask a research question regarding IV therapy?  I want to know if there is a difference between using a catheter or a butterfly for frequent administration.  Does the catheter leave more scar tissue, creating more phlebitis?
lynncrni
I just finished looking at

I just finished looking at this question for a new online CE program. I have never found any studies at all that look at the amount of scar tissue formed by each type of catheter. However, there is a lot of data on the fact that winged steel needles carry a much greater risk of infiltration/extravasation and should only be used for drawing blood samples. It is never appropriate to use them for infusion of anything, especially any medication that must infuse over any length of time with the nurse not being present for the complete infusion. Many medications are vesicants including vancomycin, potassium, etc. So this is not just limited to cancer drugs. Use a small gauge short peripheral catheter for all infusions.  

 

Lynn Hadaway, M.Ed., RN, BC, CRNI

www.hadawayassociates.com

Lynn Hadaway, M.Ed., NPD-BC, CRNI

Lynn Hadaway Associates, Inc.

PO Box 10

Milner, GA 30257

Website http://www.hadawayassociates.com

Office Phone 770-358-7861

Nikki LHommedieu
Thank you so very much. 
Thank you so very much.  This is exactly what I needed to know!  Really appreciate you taking the time to help.
Daphne Broadhurst
Steel vs. Catheter SQ injection/infusion sets

I am looking for evidence that would support moving from the steel butterly needles to catheters for SQ infusions or frequent injections which require the device to remain insitu, unsupervised. The INS standards address this for peripheral IVs. Unfortunately, this is not sufficient for the administrators I'm working with. If anyone can provide references that would help support this change in practice, I would really appreciate it!

Daphne Broadhurst
Desjardins Pharmacy
Ottawa ON

Daphne Broadhurst
Desjardins Pharmacy
Ottawa, Canada

lynncrni
 See INS standard #60

 See INS standard #60 Continuous Subcutaneous Infusion and Access Devices. 6 references listed about SC access device but I can't quote what they say. Lynn

Lynn Hadaway, M.Ed., NPD-BC, CRNI

Lynn Hadaway Associates, Inc.

PO Box 10

Milner, GA 30257

Website http://www.hadawayassociates.com

Office Phone 770-358-7861

Log in or register to post comments